Chapter 9: Teacher training

Contents

  1. Independent living skills ombudsman - are combined O&M, RT and Low Vision teacher training programs realistic?
    Antonina Adamowicz-Hummel, Poland
  2. A collaborative approach to the training of care and support staff working with visually impaired people
    Susan Ann Clamp, UK
  3. Changing lives through inter disciplinary training
    Mark Gray, UK
  4. The outcomes of two workshops for trainers of teachers of children and young people with a visual impairment in Europe
    Steve McCall, Heather Mason, UK
  5. Multi-sensory science teaching: a method to blind and visually impaired students
    Miqel-Albert Soler Marti, Spain
  6. Strategies for special education in Czech Republic
    Lea Svecova-Kvetonova, Czech Republic
  7. Training professionals at the ONCE
    Mariano Del Valle Abad, Spain
  8. Open Distance Learning for Teachers and Support staff of the Visually Impaired - 'Training with Europe'- an Eastern model
    Sue Walker, UK, and Steluta Bageag, Romania

lecture
9.1

Independent living skills ombudsman - are combined O&M, RT and Low Vision teacher training programs realistic?

full text of lecture 9.1

Antonina Adamowicz-Hummel, Poland

Address:
College for Special Education
Foundation AWare Europe, Ul. CISOWA 4, Granica, 05-806, Poland
Fax: +48 22 7582525
E-mail: antonina@hummel.it.pl

The discussion of personnel preparation in the combined areas of Orientation and Mobility, Rehabilitation Teaching and Low Vision is presented. The differences between combining the expertise of the three fields and incorporating the elements of two of the other areas into training in the basic one are highlighted. Overlapping against unique aspects of those areas are considered. Illustration of an attempt to combine the three areas in a training program in Poland is provided.


lecture
9.2

A collaborative approach to the training of care and support staff working with visually impaired people

full text of lecture 9.2

Susan Ann Clamp, UK

Address:
St. Vincent's School
Yew Tree Lane, West Derby, Liverpool, L12 9HN England
Fax: +44 151-252-0216

In early 1994, staff development officers from 3 special schools for the visually impaired in England, came together to discuss how they could offer specific training to care and support staff. A nationally accredited course was not available. Discussions focused on the most effective form of training. A university accredited course was essential. A part-time modular approach over a 2 year period would allow staff to develop the required areas of professional expertise.
The course needed to cover a wide range of topics. Some modules were essential to all staff, other modules were specific to their particular employment. A system of Core, Required and Optional modules was evolved covering vision, mobility, learning support, residential care, additional disabilities, communication and others.
By September 1995, this OPSIS course had received accreditation with Plymouth University.

To date, two cohorts have completed the training ('95 - '97, '97 - '99) with 93 participants achieving a Certificate of Higher Education. The flexibility and philosophy of the course has enabled it to move into a European dimension. Already it has provided further training opportunities for teachers and support staff in Romania and Bulgaria. Close links have been formed with the schools for the visually impaired in these countries.


lecture
9.3

Changing lives through inter disciplinary training

full text of lecture 9.3

Mark Gray, UK

Address:
RNIB MDTS
7 The Square, 111 Broadstr., Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 1AS UK
Fax: +44 0121-6431738
E-mail: mgray@rnib.org.uk

In 1993 RNIB MDTS launched its first comprehensive training package for carers working with adults and young people with multiple disabilities.
The programme was recently relaunched in early 2000 and re-evaluated.
The paper will cover three key areas of the evaluation findings.

  1. How the course has dramatically changed the lives of service users with profound disabilities. (Examples will be shown on Video and OHP)
  2. How the programme has developed inter-agency co-operation and changed and improved services design around the UK.
  3. How the course has been revised from its original formats and adapted for different areas of the care sector.

lecture
9.4

The outcomes of two workshops for trainers of teachers of children and young people with a visual impairment in Europe

full text of lecture 9.4

Steve McCall, Heather Mason, UK

Address:
University of Birmingham
School of education, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT UK
Fax: +44 121 414 4865
E-mail: S.McCall@bham.ac.uk

Since the last ICEVI European conference two major workshops for trainers of teachers of children and young people with a visual impairment in Europe have taken place. The first workshop took place in Budapest, Hungary in March 1997 and was attended by representatives from most of the European countries offering specialist training. Following the success of this workshop, a second one took place in Bratislava, Slovakia, September 1999. This paper addresses some of the positive outcomes arising from both workshops and plans for future co-operation in this area.


lecture
9.5

Multi-sensory science teaching: a method to blind and visually impaired students

full text of lecture 9.5

Miqel-Albert Soler Marti, Spain

Address:
O.N.C.E.
Calle Prado 24, Madrid 28014, Spain
Fax: +34 91 429 31 18

Science subjects are presently being taught using primarily visual criteria at all academic levels. This happens because we are determined to homogenise students within a single capacity that is socially considered to be predominant: sight. Nevertheless, scientific phenomena always comply with at least one of the two characteristics outlined below:

Multi-sensory science teaching is a method that can be put into practice at all academic levels. It enables the sciences to be taught and learnt through the use of all the senses in an interdependent manner. By providing adequate developmental and sensory stimulation guidelines, it can achieve significant learning success based on a wide-ranging and scientific perception of the natural environment.

Multi-sensory science teaching is a method that has recently been worked out and systemised by the author of this paper. It is an innovative method designed to teach the experimental and natural sciences to blind and visually impaired students. Furthermore, recent research carried out at the Universitat de Barcelona has reached the conclusion that the method works well not only for these students but also for those who are free from any sort of visual handicap


lecture
9.6

Strategies for special education in Czech Republic

full text of lecture 9.6

Lea Svecova-Kvetonova, Czech Republic

Address:
Charles University, Department of Special Education
M. D. Rettigoré 4, Praha 1, 110 00 Czech Republic
Tel: +420 2 1900 246
E-mail: lea@braillnet.cz

Special Education has gone through tremendous changes during the past 20 years. How far has been this reflected in the Czech Republic? The national system has always supported institutional care, but from 1989 new alternative methods emerged. Is special education as taught at the Charles University ready to pass to students the latest developments? Do the students have enough information to practise new approaches? The lecture will amongst other give a comparison to changes in education approach with respect to the old and new model of care with special focus on the implications in Czech environment. The curriculum of Special Education at the Charles University reacts upon the need of a multidisciplinary approach. But how effective can we be?


lecture
9.7

Training professionals at the ONCE

full text of lecture 9.7

Mariano Del Valle Abad, Spain

Address:
O.N.C.E.
Calle Prado 24, Madrid 28014, Spain
Fax: +34 91 429 31 18
E-mail: mvab@once.es

The training model proposed by the O.N.C.E. is essentially characterised by offering internal training for both its in- house professionals and as well as external professionals making up the educational community involved in integrating blind and visually impaired students.

Initiation courses, specialisation courses, congresses, short courses and autonomous working groups are just some of the training modalities that the O.N.C.E. offers to both its in-house and external professionals according to the training needs detected. The organisation has signed collaboration agreements with different levels of government to train professionals employed by them to care for the blind and visually impaired.

The training of external professionals from the public and private sectors is approached from an attitude of openness and collaboration with the educational community. Describing and evaluating the different training modalities (postgraduate studies, teacher training for educational psycho-pedagogical orientation and action groups, university students, etc.) are of utmost importance and interest.

Finally, the structures and services that carry out the organisation's training are analysed. The author points out the functions and components of these. She also underlines the importance of the co-ordination between the General Directorate and the Educational Resource Centres concerning the professional training modules.


lecture
9.8

Open Distance Learning for Teachers and Support staff of the Visually Impaired - 'Training with Europe'- an Eastern model

full text of lecture 9.8

Sue Walker, UK, and Steluta Bageag, Romania

Address:
Royal London Society for the Blind
Dorton House, Seal, Sevenoaks, Kent TN15 OED, UK
Fax: +44 1732 592599
E-mail: suewalker@compuserve.com

Vocational School for visually impaired children
Str. Industriei 2, 5250 Rimnicu, Sarat, Romania
Fax: +40 38 567 752

In 1997 the successful British Opsis Certificate Course in Care and Support of the Visually Impaired was offered to the Scola Profesionala Speciala Number 2 in Rimincu Sarat, Rumania.

It was decided to run a Pilot Project in 1997-8 to test and improve the Distance Learning plan. The application for European funding was successful in the Socrates Comenius 3.1 group under the title 'Training With Europe'.

'Training With Europe' has completed its first full year with July 1999 Summer School in Rimincu Sarat. Between 1998 and 1999 18 Teachers and Support staff from the Scola Profesionala School and 2 Teachers from a school for the Partially Sighted in Bucharest have successfully achieved their certificate in Support of the Visually Impaired.

'Training With Europe' illustrates a successful Partnership between Theofaan International in the Netherlands, Rumania and the Royal London Society for the Blind - 'Together' is our motto.

Steluta Bageag from Rumania and Sue Walker RLSB jointly propose to present a paper that explains and illustrates this model of Open Distance Learning.


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